My Blog

Posts for category: Foot Care

By Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala
December 06, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Summer Feet  

The summertime is a great time to show off your new sandals and allow your feet to breathe. But since the warmer months can be rough on your feet, it's important to give your feet a little extra care to keep them looking great and feeling healthy. Here are a few tips for keeping your feet in tip-top shape during the summer.

Keep feet clean

The best line of defense against fungal infections is proper hygiene and regular inspection of the feet and toes. Wash feet with soap and water daily, and dry them thoroughly to prevent infection. Wear shower shoes in public places, like pools and locker rooms. And to prevent ingrown nails and toenail fungus, keep toenails trimmed straight across.

Avoid walking barefoot

Walking outside in the summertime without shoes increases the risk of injury and infection. You never know what’s sitting out on the beach, and the last thing you want is to unexpectedly step on a sharp rock or piece of debris and cut your foot.

Protect feet from the sun

Wearing sunscreen is extremely important in the summertime - and that means lathering up the exposed skin on your feet and ankles too. If you’re a habitual sandals wearer, make sure to put sunscreen on before putting your feet in your shoes!

Keep your feet fungus free

Coupled with good foot hygiene, you can also prevent toenail fungus by alternating your shoes. If you suspect a fungus infected nail, visit us right away for early treatment.

Treat your feet to a pedicure

Eliminate rough, dead, winter skin and improve the appearance of your toenails with a pedicure. Do it yourself, or pamper yourself with a professional pedicure for attractive summer feet you'll be proud to show off.

The American Podiatric Medical Association recommends getting your pedicure in the morning, when salon foot baths are at their cleanest. Don’t shave your legs prior to your pedicure, even if you’re tempted to! When your legs are freshly shaven, they can have small cuts that allow bacteria to enter. Also, ensure you or the person performing your pedicure does not cut your cuticles, because they are your nail’s barrier to infection.

After the pedicure, don’t leave nail polish on all summer long. Remove it periodically to allow your nail bed to breathe, and then you’re free to swap to another festive summer color!

Prevent painful blisters

Sandals and flip-flops can lead to irritating blisters when they rub against your bare skin. Use padding or bandages to prevent and reduce friction.

Examine your flip flops

Flip flops are great for allowing your feet to breathe all summer long, but thong sandals can result in sore feet and ankles due to their lack of support. Choose styles with arch and heel support to keep feet healthy and pain-free.

Following these easy steps during the summer months can go a long way in keeping your feet looking and feeling their very best. Inspect your feet daily, and if you encounter any unusual foot problems or experience pain, contact our office for a thorough evaluation.

By Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala
November 08, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions  

Of all the foot problems to have, bunions can be one of the most challenging. Not only are bunions sometimes painful, they are also bunionsembarrassing and can cause problems with the way your shoes fit. Learn more about bunions and how they can be corrected with the help of your podiatrist Dr. Robert Linn, Jr. at Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala, Florida.

What Are Bunions and What Causes Them?
Bunions are a foot deformity that causes the inner part of the foot to push outward while the toes move closer together. At least 23 percent of adult Americans have this condition according to the Framingham Foot Study. It is often ignored until it becomes painful. Bunions are often caused by wearing certain shoes, like pointed-toe high heels that push the toes together. This may be why it is most prevalent in women. Bunions can also run in the family.

Bunions Are Very Distinctive
If you have a bunion, you'll definitely know it. It sticks out like a sore thumb—only on your foot. A bunion looks like a growth on the inside of the foot, but it is really a bone that has moved out of its proper position (the metatarsal bone). In most cases, bunions happen on both feet and the toes will sometimes overlap, which is not normal. Your toes should be straight, properly spaced, and well-aligned.

Bunion Treatments That Can Help
If you have bunions, there are treatments that can help get your foot back to being well-formed. Here are some things your Ocala, FL podiatrist may prescribe:

- Foot pads placed on the bunion to manage pain while it’s healing.
- Orthotic devices or orthopedic shoes to help realign the toes.
- Corticosteroid injections to treat inflammation.
- Bunionectomy, a surgery to remove part of the bone or repair the bony tissue.

Talk to a Foot Doctor
It’s best to get help for bunions as soon as possible so that the condition doesn’t get any worse. Call 352-861-1055 today to schedule an exam at Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala in Florida with Robert Linn, Jr. so that he can start you on a treatment plan.

By Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala
November 03, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Health  

Looking for a safe, easy and inexpensive way to stay healthy, increase your energy level and improve your figure? Start walking! Walking is one of the easiest and most popular forms of exercise, and, when done properly, it can significantly improve your health.

The most basic kind of walking for exercise, often called healthwalking, can be done almost anywhere and at any time, year around. And for individuals with a long history of inactivity or problems with obesity, walking is an excellent way to begin an exercise program.

If the Shoe Fits - Get Walking!

Footwear plays a vital role in the duration of your walking routine, and shoes that don't fit properly or that lack support can lead to foot pain or injuries, such as blisters, corns, calluses, nail fungus and plantar fasciitis. These problems can, in turn, discourage you from exercising, thus achieving the opposite of what you wanted!

Not sure which shoe will offer you the most support? Come into our office for an examination. We can help determine the best shoe for your feet based on your arch, walking experience and foot mechanics. Your shoes should be well-cushioned and stable, offering you comfort and fit that enables you to walk smoothly and without discomfort.

Keep Your Feet Healthy

To gain the most health benefit from walking, it's important to pay close attention to your feet. Trim your nails regularly, keep your feet clean and dry, and inspect your feet for signs of sores, blisters, corns, calluses or other infections. Serious foot ailments, such as bunions or hammertoes, should be checked by our office before you begin your exercise regimen.

Once you're ready to hit the road, set appropriate goals based on your overall health and walking experience. Start slow and build up your distance gradually. And don't forget to stretch in order to prevent injury and keep muscles loose.

Walking is meant to be safe, easy, and fun, but in order to do so, you must have healthy feet. Experiencing foot pain and discomfort isn't normal. Talk with a podiatrist if you encounter any problems while walking.

Every step you take is one step closer to a healthier lifestyle. So what are you waiting for? Take a stroll in the mall, walk your dog in the park, or grab a friend and go for a leisurely walk around your neighborhood. It's easy and fun, and, when done regularly, can lead to a healthier you!

By Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala
October 13, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear  

While high-heeled shoes may look stylish or complement your favorite outfit, they are rarely the best option for a woman's feet. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association, 39 percent of women wear high heels every day; of the women who wear heels daily, three out of four reported foot problems. Despite these numbers, many women continue to underestimate the health risks associated with high heels.

High-heeled shoes disrupt the body's alignment, crowd the toes and force the body's weight onto the ball of the foot. Wearing heels can contribute to a variety of foot and ankle problems, including:
 

  • Achilles tendonitis: The Achilles tendon and calf muscles tighten and shorten as the front of the foot moves down in relation to the heel. This causes stress and painful inflammation of the Achilles tendon.

  • Bunion:. Narrow-toed shoes can cause a bony growth on the joint at the base of the big toe. The bunion forces the big toe to slant in toward the other toes, resulting in discomfort, blisters, corns and calluses.

  • Hammertoes: A narrow toe box crowds the smaller toes into a bent, claw-like position at the middle joint.

  • Metatarsalgia: Continued high heel wear can lead to joint pain in the ball of the foot as a result of heels forcing the body's weight to be redistributed.

  • Ankle injuries: Because heels impair balance and increase the risk of falling, ankle sprains and fractures are common.

  • Pump Bump: The rigid back of a pump-style shoe can cause pressure that irritates the heel bone, creating a bony enlargement known as Haglund's deformity.

  • Neuromas: A narrow toe box and high heel can compress and create a thickening of tissue around a nerve between the third and fourth toes, leading to pain and numbness in the toes.


Still not willing to ditch the heels? There are ways to relieve some of the damaging effects of high heels.
 

  • Avoid heels taller than 2 inches

  • Choose thicker, more stable heels. Thicker heels are still stylish, plus they lessen the stress on your feet and provide better shock absorption.

  • If you must wear heels, wear your gym shoes or flats for commuting and change into your heels once you arrive to your destination.

  • Stretch and massage your calf, heel, and foot muscles. This helps relax the muscles and tendons and prevents them from tightening and shortening.

  • Avoid shoes with pointed toes


High heel shoes can cause pain and foot deformities that can last a lifetime. So the next time you go to slip on your heels for a long day at work or a night out, consider the consequences and rethink your options. If foot pain persists, visit us for treatment.

By Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala
September 18, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Wound Care  

Your foot doctor Dr. Robert Linn, Jr. at the Foot & Ankle Center in Ocala, FL wants you to be informed about wound care, especially if wound careyou’re a patient who needs diabetic foot therapy. Proper wound care is particularly important for the lower extremities, including the feet, toes and ankles. Learn more about taking care of wounds to ensure that your feet stay healthy.

What Is Wound Care?
A wound is normally an easy problem to resolve with a little hydrogen peroxide, antibiotic ointment, and band-aids. But sometimes wounds take longer to heal when they’re on the feet. This is because when a patient has circulation problems, the blood cells aren’t getting to the wound in a timely fashion for healing. This may be a problem for patients with uncontrolled diabetes or vascular conditions. Common wounds include:

- Puncture wounds.
- Foreign items stuck in wounds (like an ingrown nail or shard of glass).
- Insect bites that don’t heal.

Why Is It Important?
For certain patients, even a tiny wound can become a very concerning problem if it isn’t treated properly and promptly by your Ocala, FL foot doctor. The wound can get infected and develop into an ulcer. Ulcers may lead to loss of skin, muscle, or even bone tissue, and may require surgery in advanced cases.

Wound Care Tips
Here are a few tips to keep in mind when caring for a wound:

- Keep the wound dry and clean at all times. Bandage it securely.
- Wear clean, dry socks and avoid walking around barefoot.
- Carefully remove any object from inside the wound. If you’re not sure the object is out, have a doctor examine it immediately.
- Examine the depth and size of the wound—the deeper it is the higher the risk of it getting infected. 
- See a foot doctor immediately if the wound worsens instead of beginning to heal.

Get Help with Wound Care
The team at Foot & Ankle Center of Ocala, FL specializes in helping patients with wound care and diabetic foot care. Call 352-861-1055 today to schedule a visit with Dr. Robert Linn, Jr.